Experts Optimistic About Majority of Valley Crop Yield

Experts Optimistic About Majority of Valley Crop Yield

This late season heat wave is impacting the later planted crops, but experts say other farmers will be just fine. The weather though is having a negative impact on the development and growth of double crop soybeans - that's those planted after wheat. But other crops that were planted early have already matured, and they did so in good weather for growing, so much of the Valley could have a good year for corn and popcorn.
We're not the only one feeling the burn with this heat wave - many are wondering what this hot, dry weather is doing corn and soybean crops.

This late season heat wave is impacting the later planted crops, but experts say other farmers will be just fine.

The weather though is having a negative impact on the development and growth of double crop soybeans - that's those planted after wheat.

But other crops that were planted early have already matured, and they did so in good weather for growing, so much of the Valley could have a good year for corn and popcorn.

One farmer reports a 4,000 pounds per acre yield of popcorn...last year, it was just 10-percent of that.

"Mixed bag across the Wabash Valley. We're going to have some really good yields it looks like for some of the early crops and some of the soils that didn't get excess moisture seep in. We're going to see some fair to below average yields in some areas where it was excessive moisture and/or late or delayed planting," explains Jim Luzar of the Purdue Ag Extension.

But experts have a bigger concern regarding the dry weather.

"One of the things I'm concerned about with continued hot temperatures and dryness are field fires. And so we want motorist to start thinking about paying attention to anything that's thrown out of the vehicle in terms of a lit cigarette can catch some of this phone much that's dry and crisp can catch on fire," he said.

The market is already offering a premium for early delivery because of the lack of corn last year.

That's leading some farmers to begin harvesting already.
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