41°F
Sponsored by

Debunking the Weather Rumors

Your Weather Authority works around the clock to keep you up to date on the latest storms, but just how soon can they have all the details? Weather models from all across the globe try their best a predicting the next big event, but experts say there are two that tend to be the most accurate, the American and European models.
Social media took off this week with wild rumors of 20, even 30 inches of snow heading our way.
   
There are dozens of weather models from around the world, but experts say not every one is right.

And predicating forecasts far in advance isn't as easy as it may seem.

Your Weather Authority works around the clock to keep you up to date on the latest storms, but just how soon can they have all the details?

"When you are out seven days or plus, all we can basically say is here is the trend we have a storm coming, but the track on it, the type of precipitation that when you're that far out it's very difficult," said chief meteorologist Jesse Walker.

Weather models from all across the globe try their best a predicting the next big event, but experts say there are two that tend to be the most accurate, the American and European models.

"The European model has been around longer, it has been tweaked more and to be honest over the course of time it probably has been a bit more accurate than the American model," said Walker.

Because even when it comes to forecasting weather patterns, practice makes perfect.

"Just like anything you do any job you do, the longer you been at it the better you're going to be. So that's probably why generally tends to be a little bit more accurate," said Walker.

Some models from around the world have been predicting that over a foot of snow will hit the Midwest on Tuesday, but meteorologists say tracking a storm while it's still a sea can be very difficult.

"Once the storm comes on shore in California the weather balloon get into it. Then we get information about it and that inputs into the models. Then the models tend to converge, become closer together and they become more accurate," said Walker.

And if you were hoping for a reprieve from the wicked winter weather, the models are not leaning in your favor.

"We don't see it really easy until probably later in the month of February," said Walker.

The European model accurately predicted Hurricane Sandy making landfall seven days before it actually happened.



Page: [[$index + 1]]
comments powered by Disqus
bridalguide.png

skywatch.png

textalerts.png

GDL_2.png

valleyexperts.png

calendar.png

socialmedia.png

wvhomes1.png

wvjobs1.png